Heart Hugger Blog

How Hospitals Can Reduce Complications in Heart Surgery Patients

Posted by Heart Hugger on Aug 23, 2018 11:31:00 AM

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surgeon and surgical team

Complications after heart surgery are bad news for patients, but also for hospitals. Wound complications in a patient can be devastating financially for hospitals, especially when handling Medicare and co-morbid patients. The cost to hospitals can range from $13,000 to $100,000 per complication. Then add on the financial penalties that hospitals face for having excessive readmissions according to the 2010 Affordable Care Act. It’s evident that there is a great need to reduce the chances of complications following a patient’s surgery.

Taking Care of Patients and Your Institution's Best Interests

Posted by Heart Hugger on Jan 9, 2018 6:51:00 PM

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cardiologist meeting with patient

As you develop relationships with your patients, as a doctor or nurse, you have to consider every aspect of their care, while also considering your medical institution's best interest. As you go through the process of your patient's care, you will want to consider the process of recovery. Each patient will recover differently, but there are recovery aids which could benefit your patients in a big way.

Why Your Patients Need Heart Hugger

Posted by Heart Hugger on Nov 6, 2017 7:23:00 PM

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caregiver with patient

In today's world, we have a lot of questions and three times as many answers. Sometimes, that's a good thing. We can get second (and third) opinions on just about anything. We can get the same information from a variety of perspectives. We can choose how to solve problems because the power of technology and modern study has afforded us the ability to decide on the best option instead of the only option. However, more choices can also mean more confusion. How can anyone know if they're making the best possible choice when there are so many possibilities? The key is to get all of the information, study the facts, and then, ultimately, trust your instincts--and this is especially true when making patient care decisions.