Heart Hugger Blog

How Hospitals Can Reduce Complications in Heart Surgery Patients

Posted by Heart Hugger on Aug 23, 2018 11:31:00 AM

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surgeon and surgical team

Complications after heart surgery are bad news for patients, but also for hospitals. Wound complications in a patient can be devastating financially for hospitals, especially when handling Medicare and co-morbid patients. The cost to hospitals can range from $13,000 to $100,000 per complication. Then add on the financial penalties that hospitals face for having excessive readmissions according to the 2010 Affordable Care Act. It’s evident that there is a great need to reduce the chances of complications following a patient’s surgery.

Why Heart Pillows are Ineffective After Heart Surgery

Posted by Heart Hugger on Aug 7, 2018 10:07:00 AM

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heart pillow

As a trained medical professional, not only are you tasked with helping patients through difficult health issues, but you are also tasked with finding the medical solutions that make the most sense for your patient and your hospital. The Heart Pillows (also known as cough or cardiac pillows) that are distributed at hospitals, although they are well-known and widely used, are actually ineffective for patients and cause hospitals more money in the long run. Heart Pillows serve as great memento’s and may provide a little mental comfort for patients, but nothing more than that.

Tips for Avoiding Sternal Dehiscence

Posted by Heart Hugger on Feb 22, 2018 6:34:00 PM

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tips to avoid sternal dehiscence

"Complications" is one word you never want to hear--especially when it comes to recovery after heart surgery. The truth is that complications can be a concern, but when you're armed with the right information, a good healing plan, and a little bit of support, it's much easier to avoid problems like sternal dehiscence.

Avoiding Sternal Dehiscence with Heart Hugger

Posted by Heart Hugger on Nov 28, 2017 7:19:00 PM

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avoid sternal dehiscence

No matter who we are or what we do, one word that we all shudder at is complications. In the medical field, this is especially true. Everyone involved in the medical field--doctors, nurses, patients, even receptionists and delivery people--don't like hearing the word complications, because it means that there will be more pain, more suffering, and more danger. For example, one all-too-common complication is sternal dehiscence, and it can strike fear into the bravest heart. How can we avoid having to hear or use the infamous word complications? One crucial step in avoiding complications after surgery is ensuring that patients know what to do to take care of their bodies and how to do it properly. Often, they need a little help with that--and that's where Heart Hugger comes in.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Preventing Sternal Dehiscence

Posted by Heart Hugger on Nov 28, 2017 12:35:00 PM

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lying in bed after heart surgery

Recovering from surgery requires care and consideration. In the case of open heart surgery, the sternal bone is cracked to access the heart and then sewn together with wires. Such a sternal wound has a few post-surgery consequences. One such complication is sternal dehiscence or the reopening of the sternal wound. Here are the do’s and don’ts of preventing sternal dehiscence.

PREVENTING STERNAL WOUND DEHISCENCE

Posted by Heart Hugger on Jul 6, 2016 5:44:00 PM

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holding hands in support

Recovering from surgery has many consequences and byproducts that are less than desirable for a patient. Of course, there is the pain to deal with, and the road to recovery may be a long one depending on the type of surgery that was necessary.  There is also the fact that the patient will need to rely on medical staff and family members for quite some time before being able to move around and function by themselves. While needing to rely on people is certainly an inconvenience, it’s not life-threatening or a medical issue. Sternal wound dehiscence, on the other hand, is a consequence that may occur that is viewed as more serious.